PEACE
PEACE
RETURN THE OLYMPICS TO SARAJEVO
GAYLEN MCGEE • 2967 MICHELSON DRIVE, SUITE G309, IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 92612 • UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
WWW.RETURNTHEOLYMPICSTOSARAJEVO.ORGWEBMASTER@RETURNTHEOLYMPICSTOSARAJEVO.ORG
ARTICLES

PLEASE SUPPORT THE OLYMPIC COMMITTEE OF BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA'S APPLICATION FOR THE 2026 SARAJEVO WINTER OLYMPICS.

IF APPROVED, IN 2019, 2026 WILL BE THE 42ND ANNIVERSARY OF THE 1984 SARAJEVO OLYMPICS.
The hope is that returning the Olympics to Sarajevo will recreate the spirit of peace and harmony that existed during the 1984 Sarajevo Olympics. This spirit will help to nurture world peace and understanding.
When the Olympics were held in Sarajevo in 1984, the City was home to a diverse ethnic and religious population.
"...The world looked to Sarajevo as a model of religious and ethnic harmony. In 1984, when athletes came to this exquisite city to compete in the Winter Olympic games, people marveled that here Orthodox Serbian and Muslim, Catholic and Jews lived and worked side by side peacefully in a unique atmosphere of tolerance and goodwill. The ancient city of Sarajevo, with over half a million people, was for centuries a cultural haven for Croats, Serbs and Muslims.

By 1990, Yugoslavia was disintegrating into rival ethnic states, and Sarajevo, the jewel of Bosnia, was surrounded in a siege that was slowly destroying the city. Civil war engulfed the region. Its people were subjected to regular shellings and unpredictable sniper fire. Food and supplies were scarce at best..."
   From: Stone Soup for the World by Marianne Larned and
             Fellowship the magazine of the Fellowship Of Reconciliation * * * "Adagio in Sarajevo" * * *
Founded in 1263, Sarajevo, then a citadel known as Vrh-Bosna, fell to the Turkish in 1429 and was renamed Bosna-Saraj or Bosna-Seraj. The town established around the citadel became an important Turkish Military and commercial centers and reached the peak of its prosperity in the 16th century. By 1660 Sarajevo had a population of over 100,000. The Congress of Berlin (1878) gave Sarajevo and the rest of Bosnia and Herzegovina to Austria-Hungary, where it remained until its incorporation, in 1918, into Yugoslavia. The city was a center of the Serbian nationalist movement. The assassination in Sarajevo of Austro-Hungarian Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife on June 28, 1914, was an immediate cause of World War I. Sarajevo was the scene of several important battles between allied resistance fighters and the Germans in World War II, during which the city sustained considerable damage. Later the city was host to the 1984 Winter Olympics (high-rise apartments built for the Games still remain in the nearby suburb of Dobrinja). Bosnia and Herzegovina declared its independence from Yugoslavia in October 1991. Immediately following the international Recognition of the republic's independence in April 1992, the country's Serbs and Croats backed respectively by Serbia and Croatia, began to claim large parts of the county's territory. Thousands across the country were killed, detained, or put to flight by fighting over the shelling from the surrounding hills, and many residents were killed. The National Museum and Library were destroyed. In accordance with the Dayton peace agreement Sarajevo and most of the surrounding region was placed under Muslim control in 1995. The city has a university (founded in 1946), several Muslim seminaries, and various institutes of higher education. It is noted for its Muslim architecture, including its Asian marketplace and more than 100 Mosques, the most important one dating from 1450. There is an international airport to the East.
THE DAYTON PEACE ACCORDS WERE SIGNED IN 1995; THIS BEGAN THE LONG PROCESS OF RECOVERY AND REJUVENATION FOR SARAJEVO AND ITS PEOPLE.
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